Jack the Ripper 1888 header image.

THE ADA WILSON NEWSPAPER ARCHIVE

An image from the newspapers showing the attack on Ada Wilson.

THE ATTAK ON ADA WILSON.

In the early hours of March 28th 1888 Ada Wilson was attacked by a man in her home at 19 Maidman Street (despite press reports that she resided at number 9), Mile End.

Although she survived the attack, it has been wondered if this was an early attack by the killer who became known as Jack the Ripper?

Reading Rose Bierman's comments in the following article, it is evident that she believed that Ada was a prostitute. You also sense that Ms., Bierman strongly disapproved of Mrs Wilson's activities,

MONEY OR YOUR LIFE

SOURCE: EAST LONDON ADVERTISER
DATE: SATURDAY 31ST 1888

On Wednesday morning a desperate attempt to murder a young dressmaker was made at Bow.

Screams for help were heard proceeding from a small thoroughfare lying midway between the East India Dock and Bow roads, and a couple of young women rushed up to two police-constables, and said that a woman was being murdered.

The two constables immediately ran to the house indicated, and there found a young woman, named Ada Wilson, lying in the passage, bleeding profusely from a fearful wound in the throat.

A doctor was instantly sent for, who, after binding up the woman's wounds, sent her to the hospital, where it was ascertained that she was in a most dangerous condition. She, however, so far recovered that she was able to state what had occurred, and gave a description of the would-be murderer.

She heard a knock at the door, and upon going there found a total stranger waiting, who demanded money from her, adding that if she did not at once produce the cash she had but a few moments to live. She refused to give the money, and the man drew from his pocket a clasp knife, with which he stabbed her twice in the throat, and immediately made off.

ATTEMPTED MURDER AT BOW

SOURCE: THE ILLUSTRATED POLICE NEWS
DATE: SATURDAY 7TH APRIL 1888

On Wednesday morning at half past twelve a desperate attempt to murder a young dressmaker was made at Bow.

Screams for help were heard proceeding from Maidman-street, Burdett-road, a small thoroughfare lying midway between the East India Docks and Bow roads, and a couple of young woman rushed up to some police-constables on duty outside the Royal Hotel and said that a woman was being murdered.

The two constables immediately ran to the house indicated in Maidman-street, and there found a young women, named Ada Wilson lying in the passage, bleeding profusely from a fearful wound in the throat.

A doctor of the Mile-end-road was instantly sent for, who, after binding up the woman's wounds, sent her to the hospital, where it was ascertained that she was in a most dangerous condition.

She, however, so far recovered that she was able to state what had occurred, and gave a description. of the would-be murderer.

It appears that she occupies both portions of the house, and was about to retire to rest, when she heard a knock at the door, and upon going there found a total stranger waiting, who demanded money from her, adding that if she did not at once produce the cash she had but a few moments to live.

She refused to give the money, and the man drew from his pocket a clasp-knife, with which he stabbed her twice in the throat and immediately made off.

From the details of the man's appearance given by Wilson, the following will be found an approximate, if not a certain description of the would-be assassin. About thirty, height 5 ft, 6 in., face sunburnt, with fair moustache, dressed in dark coat, light trousers, and wide-awake hat.

Detective-inspectors Wildy and Dillworth have charge of the case and are making every endeavour to ascertain the whereabouts of the missing man.

It is thought impossible that the injured woman can recover.

Rose Bierman: a young Jewess lodging at 9 Maidman-street made the following statement:-

"Ada Wilson, the injured woman, is the occupier of the house, but at the time of the outrage she was under notice to quit. I knew Mrs Wilson as a married woman, although I had never seen her husband.

In the evening she came into the house accompanied by a male companion, but whether he was her husband or not I could not say.

She has often visitors to see her, but I have rarely seen them myself, as Mrs Wilson lives in the front rooms, her bedroom being just at the back, adjoining the parlour.

I occupy two rooms upstairs.

Well, I don't know who the young man was, but about midnight I heard the most terrible screams one can imagine.

Running downstairs I saw Mrs Wilson, partially dressed, wringing her hands and crying, "Stop that man from cutting my throat. He has stabbed me." Then she fell fainting in the passage.

I saw all that as I was coming downstairs, but as soon as I commenced to descend, I noticed a fair young man run to the front door and let himself out. He did not seem somehow to unfasten the catch as if he had been accustomed to do so before. He had a light coat on I believe.

I don't know what king of wound Mrs Wilson had received, but it must have been deep. I should say, from the quantity of blood in the passage.

I don't know what I shall do myself. I am now keeping the feast and how can I do so with what has occurred here? I am now going to remove to some other lodgings."

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